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Create or Import Stacks

The terramate create command creates a new stack in a given directory aka stack-path. If the stack-path does not yet exist, it will be created. Code Generation will be triggered by default to initialize the newly created stack.

Stack metadata can be set upon creation of the stack.

This metadata will also be synchronized to Terramate Cloud if enabled and can help you and your team to browse through stacks better.

It can also be used to import existing Terraform or Terragrunt configurations and initialize stacks automatically for an easy on-boarding.

Examples

Create a new stack

This is the most basic example to create a stack in a directory called path/to/stack.

bash
terramate create path/to/stack

Import existing Terraform Root Modules

If you already have an existing Terraform setup in your repository and want to initialize all directories containing Terraform configurations as Terramate Stacks, you can use --all-terraform option to automatically detect those stacks and initialize them.

Terramate detects all Terraform directories that contain a backend {} configuration as a stack for you.

bash
terramate create --all-terraform

Import existing Terragrunt Modules

Similar to detecting Terraform directories, existing Terragrunt configurations can be easily initialized as Terramate Stacks.

Terramate detects all Terragrunt Modules that contain a terraform.source configuration as a stack for you.

bash
terramate create --all-terragrunt

If the Terragrunt module declare dependencies then the created stack will have its ordering attributes automatically set.

Terramate also has experimental support for Terragrunt in the change detection, check the Terragrunt integration page for more information.

Usage

terramate create [options] <stack-path>

terramate create --all-terraform

terramate create --all-terragrunt

terramate create --ensure-stack-ids

In the basic use case [options] can be one or multiple of:

Set the ID

  • --id <id>

    Default: A new UUIDv4.

    Stack IDs need to be unique within the repository. It is recommended to use an UUID as the stack id.

    Example:

    bash
    terramate create --id "my-id" path/to/stack

Set the name

  • --name <name>

    Default: The basename of the <stack-path>.

    The stack name should help users to understand what a stack is containing.

    It will be used in Terramate Cloud when listing stacks in addition to the <stack-path>.

    Example:

    bash
    terramate create --name "My first Terramate stack" path/to/stack

Set the description

  • --description <description>

    Default: the <name> of the stack.

    The description should give more details and context about the stack and the resources managed.

    It will be visible in Terramate Cloud when showing stack details and can help your team to understand previews, deployments and drift details.

    Example:

    bash
    terramate create --description "This stack contains amazing resources for my service" path/to/stack

Set tags

  • --tags <tags> A comma separated list of tags to add to the stack.

    This option can be used multiple times to define additional tags.

    Tags can be used to filter stacks when listing them or executing commands in them. They can also be used to define the order of execution with before and after configurations.

    Example:

    bash
    terramate create --tags "mytag,yourtag,gutentag" path/to/stack-a
    terramate create --tags "mytag" --tag "yourtag" --tag "gutentag" path/to/stack-b

Add imports

  • --import <path> A comma separated list of directories or files to add import blocks for in the stacks configuration.

    This option can be used multiple times to define additional import blocks.

    Example:

    bash
    terramate create --import "path/to/directory" --import "path/to/file" path/to/stack

Add explicit order of execution

  • --after <list> A comma separated list of filters.

    This option can be used multiple times to define additional after relationships.

    The <list> can contain a mix of

    • tags e.g. tag:my-tag (recommended)
    • relative paths: e.g ../path/to/stack to stacks (not recommended)

    When defined, this stack will be executed after matching stacks.

    It is recommended to use tags to maintain refactoring of stack hierarchy. Using stack-paths is available but not recommended to use anymore. When using nested stacks, an implicit order of execution is defined for you.

    Example:

    bash
    terramate create --after "tag:my-tag" --after "../another-stack" path/to/stack
  • --before <list> A comma separated list of filters.

    This option can be used multiple times to define additional before relationships.

    The <list> can contain a mix of

    • tags e.g. tag:my-tag (recommended)
    • relative paths: e.g ../path/to/stack to stacks

    When defined, this stack will be executed before matching stacks.

    It is recommended to use tags to maintain refactoring of stack hierarchy. Using stack-paths is available but not recommended to use anymore. When using nested stacks, an implicit order of execution is defined for you.

    Example:

    bash
    terramate create --before "tag:my-tag" --before "../another-stack" path/to/stack

Additional options

  • --ignore-existing

    If set, and the stack already exists do nothing and don't fail.

    Example:

    bash
    terramate create path/to/stack
    terramate create --ignore-existing path/to/stack
  • --no-generate

    Disable code generation for the newly created stacks

Special use cases

  • terramate create --all-terraform

    Detect and initialize all Terraform directories detected. See example above.

  • terramate create --all-terragrunt

    Detect and initialize all Terragrunt directories detected. See example above.

  • terramate create --ensure-stack-ids

    Ensures that every stack has an ID set. Stacks that do not have an id defined, will get a new UUIDv4 generated and set.

    A stack ID for every stack is required in order to synchronize stacks to Terramate Cloud.